Žova

Ian James
© September 2015

script name

This script is a cypher where all letters are made from one or more marks of a pre-defined stylus. In this case, the stylus has two ends, one with a blobby bar, the other with a hollow circle:

The bar can be used either vertically or horizontally. The circle is used only in vowels and punctuation. Following simple rules, certain combinations of strokes can be used as a numbering system to index a reasonably structured list of phonemes. Unlike my Phonological Cypher series the shapes in this script do not directly relate to phonological relationships, although many useful patterns can be discerned.

Consonants

All consonants have a single vertical stroke with one, two or three horizontal strokes intersecting in one of four ways (including absence of stroke). The total number of letters would be 4^3 = 64, but for aesthetic reasons I have excluded letters more than one-and-a-half bars wide (those in grey). The shapes as arranged can be seen to count in base 4. The list of consonantal phonemes has some clear internal structure, so this is not a completely arbitrary cypher. As with Pranish, when used in final position (closing a syllable), the letters for implosive and unaspirated unvoiced plosive become voiced and unvoiced unreleased stop, respectively.

Vowels

Each vowel uses the stylus-end with a hollow circle. Then a vertical and horizontal bar-stroke is added, each in one of four ways (including absence of stroke). The total number of letters is then 4^2 = 16. Even columns are used for unrounded vowels, odd columns for rounded. Again, the list of vowel phonemes has clear internal structure, so this is not a completely arbitrary cypher. For narrowing diphthongs, [j] or [w] can be used as the second phoneme.

Numerals and punctuation

Numerals are a different series of combined strokes from the consonants, and in most cases an explicit additive pattern can be seen. For example shapes 2+3 = shape 5, 2+4 = 6 and so on.

Punctuation marks use circles but are a different series of combined strokes from the vowels.

Example

This is the first line of Shakespeare’s sonnet 18, for comparison with versions of SIGIL etc.

Shall I compare thee to a summerís day?


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Last modified Sep.26,2015